History, Mission, & Values

Mission

To rescue and provide a safe habitat for wild animals using sustainable resources; to promote coexistence between humans and wildlife; and to educate the public about the preservation of wild animals and their ecosystems.

Vision

To end wildlife ownership and restore appropriate human-animal relationships.


Who we are

Wild Paws Midwest Animal Sanctuary is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to saving the lives of wild animals. We are a collection of animal lovers passionate about protecting our resources for today and beyond. Our team has over 20 years of animal keeping experience collectively, includes an experienced and passionate veterinarian, a board of directors that have all volunteered or worked for numerous years at other animal organizations, and a variety of talented volunteers all bringing their broad expertise to this organization.

What we do

We seek to rescue native wild animals that were kept as pets, used for entertainment, or from non-reputable animal parks and zoos. We will also provide a safe haven for animals that were injured or orphaned in the wild. Our habitats will mimic nature to allow every animal to feel free. We educate the public about the natural history of native species with a focus on human-animal relationships and how we can coexist. Wild Paws does not breed, buy, or sell animals, and believes wild animals should not be kept as pets.  

Why do we exist?

The wild animal trade in the U.S. exceeds 15 billion dollars annually. Laws regarding selling and trading wild animals are inconsistent from state to state and are rarely enforced. More importantly, the general public has little to no knowledge about this issue and, therefore, creating a change in state and federal laws can be extremely difficult. For the unfortunate animals who are bred, bought, or captured, the wild animal trade is a vicious cycle. Some animals are bought by breeders where they are seen only as dollar signs. Others are bought for pets when they are cute babies but are soon too much to handle when they grow up and are then disposed of as the owners see fit. And still others are bred solely for their parts. Sanctuaries across the country are overwhelmed with the volume of animals needing refuge; however, these are only the animals we know about. There are still thousands of animals hidden behind bars and concrete suffering from extreme confinement, deplorable conditions, and neglect. The cycle of animal trade needs to end, and only through knowledge and working together can real change occur.